Alex Luscombe

Alex Luscombe

PhD Candidate in Criminology

University of Toronto

About Me

Alex Luscombe is a fourth-year PhD Candidate at the University of Toronto’s Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies. His research interests include policing studies, institutional transparency and accountability, organizational networks, and computational social science. His research has been featured in numerous national and international news outlets, including BBC News, The Washington Post, Vice News, The Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star, CBC News, Global News, CTV News, and The Montreal Gazette. He is a Researcher at the Centre for Access to Information and Justice and a Junior Fellow at Massey College.

Interests

  • Policing Studies
  • Institutional Transparency & Accountability
  • Network Analysis
  • Computational Social Science

Education

  • MA in Sociology, 2013

    Carleton University

  • BA (Hons) in Sociology, 2012

    University of Victoria

Recent Posts

Parsing your .pdfs in R

In my last blog post, we discussed how to read .pdf files into RStudio. Using pdftools, we were able to read in .pdfs that were both machine-ready and not.

Publications

Freedom of Information Research and Cultural Studies: A Subterranean Affinity

Introducing the idea of subterranean affinity, this article explores how methodological use of Freedom of Information (FOI) requests can contribute to the field of cultural studies. Contributing to literatures on transparency and secrecy, we consider …

Police Foundation Governance and Accountability: Corporate Interlocks and Private, Nonprofit Influence on Public Police

Police foundations are new private organizations used by public police services to raise corporate monies in North America. This article examines problems of governance and accountability arising in relation to police foundations and police services. …

Freedom of Information and Social Science Research Design (Routledge, 2019)

This multidisciplinary volume demonstrates how Freedom of Information (FOI) law and processes can contribute to social science research design across sociology, criminology, political science, anthropology, journalism and education. Comparing the use …